Labor and Civil Rights: Bold Legacies and New Directions
Nov
4
7:00 PM19:00

Labor and Civil Rights: Bold Legacies and New Directions

  • Indiana University Presidents Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

“Labor and Civil Rights: Bold Legacies and New Directions,” a discussion with Reverend William Barber, NC NAACP, and Richard Trumka, AFL-CIO

"Our needs are identical with labor's needs: Decent wages, fair working conditions, livable housing, old-age security, health and welfare measures, conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children, and respect in the community."

                                                          Martin Luther King, Jr

In a 1961 speech at the 4th Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO, the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. declared that labor’s historic tradition is also that of the civil rights movement. He called for the two movements to realize their bond and work together. Today, King’s call is as pressing as ever. The return of some of the core problems from King’s era is threatening to reverse the progress we have made since the 1960s—economic inequality is growing; racial and class segregation is increasing; and voting rights are being called into question. In addition, the scale of incarceration, especially of young black men; the growth of student debt and the erosion of public education; the accelerating pace of global climate change; and discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity have become defining public issues of our era.

Two of today’s most transformative leaders, North Carolina NAACP president and the architect of the Moral Mondays movement, Reverend William Barber, and AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, the head of the country’s largest labor federation, will discuss strategies and prospects for grassroots social transformation. What legacy does the Reverend King leave for thinking about the issues of the 21st century? What untapped potential is available for two movements whose dynamism once shaped America? As the labor force divides into high-tech employees and minimum wage workers, what are the opportunities for finding common ground? What are the sustainable organizational and social vehicles for progress? How do the labor and civil rights movements respond to the new challenges of climate change, digital technology, rising costs of education, and globalization? 

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Wisdom Circle: SCCAP Thriving Connections Elders Conversation
Sep
24
6:00 PM18:00

Wisdom Circle: SCCAP Thriving Connections Elders Conversation

  • St. Marks United Methodist Church (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

St. Marks United Methodist Church

100 IN-46
Bloomington, IN 47408

 

Wisdom Circle: SCCAP Thriving Connections Elders Conversation

9/24 at 6:00-8:00 p.m.

 

Elder members of the SCCAP Thriving Connections community lead a Wisdom Circle sharing their thoughts, insights, experiences and reflections on John Lewis and the civil rights movement.  Thriving Connections contains people from all walks of life, all ages, all political persuasions and a wide variety of religious viewpoints.  We work on building community for the purpose of eradicating poverty, both individually with participants, and structurally, through advocacy and education. 

 

For more information, contact Linda Patton (lindap@insccap.org or 812-339-3447 x206). For more on Wisdom Circles, see https://bloomington.in.gov/media/media/application/msword/24330.doc. 

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Wisdom Circle: Mothers of Black Children
Sep
19
12:00 PM12:00

Wisdom Circle: Mothers of Black Children

Wisdom Circle: Mothers of Black Children
9/19 at 12:00-1:00

anneker Cente

Recently in the news we have seen many stories about Black youth and some of the challenges that they face. Often times, mothers are left in precarious situation raising our Black children. It is true we all navigate different spaces as mothers. Some of us are working, some stay at home, some are married, some are single, some are divorced, some are in blended families/bi-racial families, some of us are young mothers, others older mothers, and even first time mothers. We have a wealth and range of experiences, and it’s important that we have opportunities to share. Although we have a wealth of experience, what we all have in common is love for our children and that raising a Black child in today’s society might mean that we have to equip our kids to overcome challenges and understand their beauty and worth in a society that sometimes labels or misunderstands them. This Wisdom Circle is an opportunity for mothers of Black children to create a support system and get a variety of perspectives from other mothers in the community. A few of the elders involved include Valeri Haughton and Wanda Hosea. One hope of this group is to create more opportunities to build community among families in the Bloomington community. 

 

For more information, contact Stephanie Power-Carter (stecarte@indiana.edu). For more on Wisdom Circles, see https://bloomington.in.gov/media/media/application/msword/24330.doc

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Wisdom Circle: Social Justice and Community Activism--Fighting the Good Fight
Sep
15
6:00 PM18:00

Wisdom Circle: Social Justice and Community Activism--Fighting the Good Fight

 

 

Wisdom Circle: Social Justice and Community Activism--Fighting the Good Fight
9/15 at 12:00-1:00 p.m.

City of Bloomington Council Chambers (401 N. Morton St.).

This Wisdom Circle will feature Lucky H. Hall I, President of the Black Student Union at Indiana University 1970-71, as well as Janet Cheatam Bell, and Dr. Gladys F. Devane.   There will be a discussion on student activism and social justice. Come be part of the Circle. For more information, contact Rafi Hassan (hasanr@bloomington.in.gov or 812-349-3559). For more on Wisdom Circles, see https://bloomington.in.gov/media/media/application/msword/24330.doc. 

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